Defining the Art of Talent Attraction
Danielle Meakin - 6 Comments - 29 Sep 2019

Talent Attraction strategy is much more than just media acquisition, multi-posting and attracting applicants.

There is a defined art to delivering each component associated with successful talent attraction so that it optimises the outcomes during each stage of the process.

The art and techniques should be influenced by data and research, human behavioural science and tried and tested methods.

 

 

It basically consists of 3 primary elements:

 

MAXIMISING VIEWS OF YOUR JOB

 

Media Range: The breadth and range of media channels that your job actually goes out to.

Media Selection:  An evidence-based approach to selecting the right media channels where your prospective applicants are most likely to visit and that give you the best ROI.

 

GENERATING MORE APPLICATIONS

 

Improved Visibility: Increasing visibility within each media channel by manipulating the search engine, so that your job appears higher in the results, thus generating more views.

Increased conversion: Maximising applications by converting more views into actual applicants through better copywriting techniques.

 

job advert writing

 

BETTER RETENTION

 

Improved Capture: Avoiding the loss of any applicants in the first stage of the application process.

Improved Engagement: Avoiding early drop off immediately after the application takes place by deploying a reward and nurture strategy.

 

Getting all of this right for each individual job certainly isn’t easy, but many online recruiters consistently get this very wrong.

 

Working with our clients to generate significant tangible improvements in this area is certainly one of the most rewarding parts of what we do.

 

 

At SRO we have refined every single part of the talent attraction process, in order to optimise results and get more jobs filled with higher quality direct applications.

From job creation, channel selection, styling and tone, to applicant experience. We ensure that every touchpoint with each prospective candidate is designed to increase the probability of a positive outcome. To find out more request a demonstration of our platform. 

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Mark Stephens


Mark has established a reputation for his passion and enthusiasm over twenty years working in the recruitment industry, both client and agency side. For the last ten years, he has been researching the recruitment landscape from both a technology and people perspective. His insights into market trends are often used and quoted across the industry’s leading publications. His company, Smart Recruit Online, has been the winner of 5 international awards for technology innovation and Recruitment Technology in the last 18 months. And currently holds the accolade of filling more jobs from direct applications for their clients than any other online recruitment service in the UK.


Large vs Small Businesses: Which Is Better For Your Mental Health?
Danielle Meakin - 6 Comments - 29 Sep 2019

Many of us — an estimated 10 million in Britain — work in medium-to-large sized organisations. Companies which employ between 250 and 1,000 staff. But the most common source of employment remains small businesses. And very small businesses at that: about 13 million Brits earn their living in organisations with workforces that average around just five people.

Obviously, as anyone who has made the jump from small to large business (or vice versa) can tell you, life can be very different at these two ends of the employment spectrum. But which is better for employee wellbeing and mental health? As it stands, far more research has been compiled on the functions of large businesses, the government’s own civil servants, in particular. But with investigations of small businesses finally catching up, a picture is beginning to emerge that might reveal a definite answer.

 

The power of trust

Large organisations, which often have more money to invest, often provide valuable training and avenues for their employees’ development and progression. Yet at the same time, employees tend to be suspicious of larger companies and trust them less. This may be down to two reasons: one is a simple matter of size and communication. That it is difficult to always communicate clearly to larger bodies of teams. The second is that larger corporations can be more ‘political’, with their being inevitable winners and losers divided along these political lines.

To contrast this with smaller business or self-employed workers, there are much higher levels of trust, job satisfaction and job involvement. But there are also higher levels of conflict between the spheres of home and work. In the initial advantages of flexible home working and more autonomy, there are also jarring gender differences. With women tending to be more than likely the ones with the highest home/work conflict.

While it is true that more autonomy and control over one’s work can help to reduce stress levels. The problem is that small business-based workers report having so much more of it. And with these heavier workloads comes — paradoxically — raised cortisol (stress) levels. Small business-based workers have also reported increased loneliness and isolation than their larger-organisational counterparts.

 

Company Culture

 

 

The power of performance

As larger organisations struggle to communicate with their employees. It should not be surprising that they also struggle to recognise the individual contributions of their hardest workers. The resulting effect is that people often feel like they are nothing more than invisible cogs in a huge machine. Efforts to identify hard work, such as performance management systems and KPIs, are only understood to have short term benefits. In the long run, asymmetric salaries, bonuses, and promotions, only serve to punish and demoralize workers who feel they’ve been left behind.

Competitive cultures can make the workplace an unpleasant environment, and drive out pro-social behaviour. And if the competition is valued above learning and development this can lead to what is known as ‘knowledge hoarding’. Where team members guard the secrets to their success to ward off rivals.

Mastery Climates

Small businesses, on the other hand, tend to lean toward so-called ‘mastery climates’, which are the opposite of knowledge hoarding ones. Here people are encouraged to emphasise learning and collaborations with co-workers. Yet that doesn’t mean mastery climates are only available to small businesses. On the contrary, such a climate can be replicated by local managers able to implement model knowledge sharing behaviours by putting a great degree of trust in the employees. In large organisations, positive organisation and support can go a great deal to overcome the conflict that can come about in hierarchies.

 

The power of ‘job crafting’

It seems that there are not a lot of opportunities to determine what and how the work is done in larger, hierarchical businesses. The result is that work is often fragmented into smaller pieces for employees to work on. Who then fail to realise the bigger picture and the true meaning of the work carried out.

‘Job crafting’ has been shown to be effective in helping to not only retain staff. But also in engaging them and enhancing their happiness levels. Crafting in itself does nothing to reduce the demands of the job, but it does force employees to think about the resources they have and to engage and use them more effectively. This type of crafting is more familiar with smaller businesses (though it isn’t a guarantee), but there is no reason why it couldn’t be implemented into larger businesses under local managers as well.

Job crafting also encourages greater co-operation and dialogue between employees. And can help to unravel a toxic work atmosphere and reduce feelings of isolation in smaller businesses.

 

Some thoughts and reflections

There are advantages and disadvantages to working in both large organisations and smaller businesses. It is too simplistic and unfair to say that working in large hierarchical businesses is bad for employees within them. After all, working freelance, or for small companies can also be depleting and bad for mental health. What is crucial to good mental health, is that all employees recognise or find meaning in what they do. After all, work plays a hugely important role in our personal identity and wellbeing. So does making sure that we are paid well, and fairly, for the tasks at hand.

What is equally important is that, whether one is working for a large or small business, there are positive organisational supports in place. Support in the way jobs are designed, and executed; preferably by good local leaders. The use of fairer ways to track performance management is also very important. Especially if it is to lead to the development of a ‘mastery climate’.

 

This article was written by Neil Wright of Re-Space, an office refurbishment and fit-out company located in Kent, UK. 

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Neil.Wright@smartrecrooot.com'
Neil Wright


This article was written by Neil Wright of Webster Wheelchairs, one of the NHS’s leading suppliers of wheelchairs, rollators, and other elderly and disability-friendly eq


4 strategies to get the best talent for your small business
Danielle Meakin - 6 Comments - 29 Sep 2019

Did you know that unemployment rates in the UK are now at their lowest since the 1970s? This is obviously great news for the economy but presents a big challenge when it comes to hiring the best talent for your company. With the job market now being candidate-driven, finding the right people for your organisation can be harder than ever before.

We all know how important it is to have the best people working for you. With a talented and motivated team on board, your business stands the best chance of being successful. In that sense, employees are your most valuable asset, and care must be taken to recruit and retain them just as much as generating sales or managing finances.

So, are you doing all of the following?

 

Review your HR approach

A new recruitment drive is all very well but before you start thinking about hiring new employees, are you sure you’re doing everything you can for your internal staff retention and development? There’s little point hiring new people if they won’t stay with the business long enough for you to reap the benefits.

Business Coach and Online Educator Rob da Costa suggests the following talent retention incentives in one of his recent blog posts:

  • A focus on education
  • Salary increases based on merit
  • Flexible working conditions
  • Attractive benefits package
  • Pointing out future possibilities
  • Promoting from within
  • Investing in quality managers

Take a look at your team and ask yourself how happy and engaged your workforce is. Are you training them, promoting them, rewarding them appropriately? Do you have a positive company culture? In a job seekers’ market, it’s not just job seekers who are being harder to please. Your existing staff may consider changing jobs if they feel more valued elsewhere.

 

Invest in your company culture

Company culture is a big and growing topic that you cannot afford to neglect. It’s a magic formula that goes like this: Get your business model and your internal culture right and you’ll be surprised just how quickly word gets around that your company is the place to be.

When your candidates, employees, customers and the public interact with your business, what’s their experience? The way your company is perceived hinges on its internal culture and how this is managed. Everything follows from here – from team engagement and productivity to employee happiness, staff retention, and business success.

Identifying and developing your company’s brand doesn’t have to be expensive, but it does have to be done. Here are four things you should be doing:

  • Build authentic and meaningful recognition and reward into your company culture to meet your employees’ needs to be recognised for their efforts and achievements, and drive performance, staff retention and employee engagement.
  • Build strong teams that collaborate eagerly, communicate openly, trust each other’s views and are motivated to engage in best performance. Team building shouldn’t be a one-off activity, day-to-day reinforcement may be needed to create a collaborative work culture.
  • Build a flexible work environment, allowing and trusting your staff to choose when, where and how they work. This freedom coupled with personal accountability strengthens your work culture by encouraging happier, higher-performing teams.
  • Create a caring culture that genuinely looks after its employees and goes beyond the norm. X, Y, Z generations want to know that you will look after their best interests and care for them, especially in their hour of need. Employees now prefer healthy food and access to help and advice over a beer fridge or pool table.

 

Company culture

 

Recruit with precision and focus

If there are no internal candidates you can promote to the vacancy, outside recruitment is going to be your next step. Start with a clear job description and be focused on what exactly you are looking for in the right candidate, and what you are going to offer.

The customary ‘spray and pray’ efforts of yesteryear will no longer cut it in a job market where candidates can afford to be choosy. With so many other companies competing for the highest calibre candidates, your job advert needs to stand out for all the right reasons.

In order to reach the right people, you need to know where to find them. Social media platforms, such as LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook, are an excellent place to start engaging with potential candidates. There are plenty of specialist organisations and software tools to help you with this. You could also partner with a recruitment consultant who will have the time and resources to dig deep into the job market on your behalf.

 

Ensure a positive candidate experience

Once you have shortlisted your best candidates for an interview, follow through with a carefully prepared and organised meeting. It’s amazing how many companies invest time and effort into recruiting candidates, yet blow their chances on the day. A good candidate will know if they’re being fobbed off with an ad hoc interview.

A negative candidate experience is unlikely to lead to the result you are seeking. Worse still, a disappointed candidate may share his experience on online platforms. Poor feedback may discourage others from joining your company and negatively impact on your brand.

According to recent figures, a positive experience will make the job candidate about 1/3 more likely to accept your job offer. You are selling your company, so you should put your best people in front of the candidates that you want to impress. Confident, ambitious job seekers will have plenty of other opportunities on the table, so do your best to woo them.

 

Written By Annie Button

 

Smart Recruit Online offers an award-winning talent attraction software that can streamline and revolutionise your recruitment. To find out what we can to for your recruitment strategy, book a demo by clicking here.

 

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Annie Button


Annie Button is a Portsmouth based writer and recent graduate. Annie has written for various online and print publications, she specialises in business, recruitment and career development.


5 Best Practices For Candidate Vetting in 2019
Danielle Meakin - 6 Comments - 29 Sep 2019

5 Best Practices For Candidate Vetting in 2019 By Rick Witherspoon.

Recruiters are getting smarter about how they filter out applicants during the hiring process. Scary stats like the cost of making the wrong hire motivate in-house recruiters to be more careful about whom they extend job offers. The cost of hiring the wrong fit can be up to 2.5x the salary – as much as $240,000, according to one report.

In a job market where roles require specialized technical knowledge, vetting processes must keep up. Fierce competition over the best candidates, as well as pressure to perform on key metrics like employee turnover and cost-per-hire, encourage in-house recruiters to spend more time in the vetting phase of the hiring process. Here are the best practices smart recruiting teams follow to vet candidates in 2019.

 

Use the right software

Software tools and platforms are critical to helping recruiters filter out candidates in the early phases of their hiring process. “A vetting process should allow you to filter out candidates who don’t have the skills necessary to succeed in the role. To do this, you’ll want to start by vetting the applicant’s resume, cover letter, and other application materials they’ve submitted for review,” recommends Smart Recruit Online.

Likewise, these tools can positively impact diversity hiring and help an HR team be unbiased when evaluating resumes. Testing and assessment tools like Codility, HackerRank, pymetrics, and Vervoe filter candidates based on real-world simulations, allowing candidates to be ranked based on skillset rather than what’s on their resume. Vetting tools help recruiters be more organized, efficient, and purposeful in who they invite to proceed to the next stage of the recruiting process.

 

Integrate AI to assist recruiters

Many of these software tools use algorithms to filter resumes by keywords, but this year’s trend takes it a step further. Companies in Silicon Valley are working on smarter AI solutions to read applications beyond simple keyword identification. “Instead of one person reading through hundreds of resumes, they envision a process in which AI can quickly sort through data. CEO Somen Mondal compares its tech to a recommendation engine, much like Amazon or Netflix — the first line of defence against high-volume hiring,” writes The Verge. Tools are getting smarter and smarter at helping recruiters vet through the initial influx of candidates.

 

Outsource your vetting process

Tools and algorithms can’t be replaced by human interaction, however. There’s a limit to how far a robot can take the vetting process – and thereafter, a significant amount of human resources are dedicated to finding the best person for the job. Especially in executive searches, third-party recruiters are necessary to make sure the right person is hired the first time around.

More and more companies are outsourcing their executive recruiting to a talent and recruitment agency. They’re seeking an objective perspective on their vetting process; recruiters outside the company can truly evaluate whether or not a person is the best candidate. Outsourcing gives companies the benefit of building specialized, world-class teams without having to hire in-house experts with the technical knowledge to properly vet technical candidates.

Talent Attraction

 

Ask the right questions

One of this year’s biggest trends? Asking smart questions. Historically, interview questions followed the same line, no matter what industry you were in. “Why should we hire you?” is one of those outdated, overused questions that don’t offer much insight into a candidate’s ability. Instead, recruiters across the board are investing more time in candidate vetting with job-related or behavioural questions that assess the candidate’s fit. “While it is good to hire people who match the personalities or personal backgrounds of your current employees, it is just as important to seek out a diversity of opinions, backgrounds, and interests in the people you hire,” writes one expert from Glassdoor.

 

Consider merit, rather than background

Perhaps the biggest overall candidate vetting trend of 2019 is the impulse to move beyond the resume. For example, JavaScript is the most well-known language among software developers, according to a survey by Hackerrank. But, students aren’t learning JavaScript – it’s not taught in most university computer science programs. Companies that want to hire developers with experience in JavaScript must look past a college diploma to vet candidates who haven’t taken the traditional route. Today’s vetting procedures weigh career trajectory more heavily than educational achievement. This benefits candidates and companies alike – the future of vetting practices looks brighter than ever.

 

This article was originally published on Elevate Talent.

RICK WITHERSPOON

Rick is the Senior Recruiting Manager at Elevate Talent, a recruiting agency that helps companies build their Go-To-Market and People Operations teams.

 

Offering support for both recruiters and on-site HR workforces, Smart Recruit Online helps businesses find and hire the best talent more efficiently. To see how SRO can improve your talent acquisition, campaign management, and candidate screening workflows, book a demo today. 

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RickWitherspoon@smartrecrooot.com'
Rick Witherspoon


Rick is the Senior Recruiting Manager at Elevate Talent, a recruiting agency that helps companies build their Go-To-Market and People Operations teams.


Employer Branding Videos & Why They Work
Danielle Meakin - 6 Comments - 29 Sep 2019

In today’s candidate-driven market, a positive, definite employer brand is important for attracting and retaining top talent. With an employer profile, you have numerous opportunities to showcase your companies’ unique brand and culture. Including online videos in your profile is a brilliant way to communicate your employer brand to candidates due to the rise in video.

The rise in video is quickly increasing and radically shifting as the main source of how we consume our information compared to text-based and image-based content.

Research undertaken by Wyzowl found that where both video and text are available on the same page, 72% of people would rather use video to learn about a product or service.

As of May 2016, YouTube reported more than 1 billion users; growth in viewing time is up at least 50% each of the past three years. For 2015, Cisco reported 55% of all mobile data traffic came from video, and predicts video will account for 82% of mobile data traffic by 2021.

How exactly can an employer branding video support a company in the recruiting process? Why does it work so well? Here are some top tips on how employer branding videos can support your hiring process.

 

To ensure a cultural fit

A video is a great way to showcase your employer branding to candidates. 75% of job seekers consider an employer’s brand before even applying for a job (CareerArc).

They want to know what the company culture is like, will they fit in, will they love going to work every day, will they want to get involved in after work activities like tag rugby. Therefore, video is the best way to do this. Potential candidates will be to assess if working at your company is what they are looking for.

 

Company Culture

 

Get more applicants

Not only does video catch the attention of your potential job candidates, but it is also a brilliant way for convincing candidates to apply to your open job vacancies. CareerBuilder research has found that job postings with videos have a 34% greater application rate.

Basically, by including video in your job postings you can get a vast increase in the number of job applicants you can choose from.

 

Saves Time

Research undertaken by TheLadders showed that potential candidates are only reading jobs ads for about 50 seconds if they don’t feel the job is a good fit and around 75 seconds for ads that seemed to match their skills and interests.

Considering the time and effort that goes into writing up a good job description, they hardly seem a worthy investment. In contrast, studies have seen candidates spend over five minutes viewing job ads containing video.

This is an increase of almost 490% in time spent. A CV-Library poll of thousands of candidates also revealed that nearly 80% of job seekers would be more likely to apply for a job that contained a video in the job description. Thus, you will considerably shorten your whole hiring process and better your time to hire.

 

Attracting Millennials

The way millennials consume information is different from previous generations.

Millennials watch more videos online than anybody else. Therefore, searching for and finding young talent should incorporate video as part of the recruitment strategy. Otherwise, you will fall behind other companies.

In fact, research on Millennials shows that 54% visit YouTube every day. It is believed that by 2030, millennials will make up 75% of the workforce. This, in turn, means that your recruitment should be focused on this generation. For this to transpire, the old traditional recruiting mechanisms need to be replaced with more modern alternatives such as the use of video.

Creating a compelling employer brand video that showcases your mission, your vision and your values will be easier if you’ve done your research and have a clearly defined employer brand.

 

Cathal Doorley is the Founder & CEO of Rezoomo.com with over 5 years in the online marketing and web development industry & over 3 years in the recruitment industry. Specialising in employer branding and recruitment marketing.

 

Smart Recruit Online offers an award-winning talent attraction software that will streamline and revolutionise your recruitment strategy.

We also offer a customisable Careers Page that can mirror your company branding and be fully integrated into your website.

To find out what we can to for your recruitment strategy, including using video to promote your company culture, book a demo by clicking here.

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Cathal.Doorley@smartrecrooot.com'
Cathal Doorley


Cathal Doorley is the Founder & CEO of Rezoomo.com with over 5 years in the online marketing and web development industry & over 3 years in the recruitment industry. Specialising in employer branding and recruitment marketing.


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