5 Signs That You Are Interviewing a Bad Candidate
Danielle Meakin - 6 Comments - 29 Sep 2019

5 Things To Look Out For During An Interview by Mark Stephens

When interviewing applicants it can sometimes be easy to get carried away and miss the warning signs, especially if you actually like the individual sitting in front of you. However, recruiting the right people means ruthlessly discarding those that don’t meet the minimum standards.

Here are 5 critical items to look out for when you run your next interview:

 

1. They haven’t prepared for the interview

As an absolute minimum, any individual attending an interview should have visited your website, know a little bit about you, and be able to explain what it is that you do. If they don’t know these basics, then how can they put forward a strong case as to why you should hire them?

 

2. They don’t ask questions

Some people are very good at responding to interview questions and articulating what they think you want to hear, but anyone that is serious about establishing a successful career with you will have plenty of questions for you and not just at the end of the interview. Each time you ask the applicant a question, this is a great opportunity for the best candidates to respond with questions of their own.

 

3. No depth to their answers

Weak candidates and those that might have expanded upon the truth in their CV’s have very little depth, and this is relatively easy to establish. Behavioural interviewing techniques will allow you to ask several layers of questions around the original question and when people lack genuine knowledge, understanding and experience, they tend to come unstuck. When you take this approach they generally start to waffle. Look for eyes that look to the candidate’s right when responding. This is an obvious sign that they are tapping into the creative side of their brain to make up an answer.

 

Candidate Behaviour

 

4. They see their job as 9-5

Some jobs are for plodders, but when most of us recruit, we want dynamic, energetic, self-motivated people who can take on responsibility and treat your company and customers with care and attention and grow with the company. The reward for this is longevity, stability, respect, progress, responsibility and remuneration that should increase appropriately. To progress faster requires more educational input and that should not stop within the confines of a working day. People who do not invest in themselves, through self-learning, reading, courses and training will only ever likely be plodders.

 

5. They don’t accept responsibility for their mistakes

During the interview, you’ll want to ask about a time when they had to handle a difficult or awkward situation at work and how they resolved it. You can also ask them about their previous working relationships, especially those with managers that might have held them back.

People who blatantly blame others for their own lack of success or failures will bring that blame culture and mentality into your organisation.

 

Screening

Getting applicants to complete a behavioural assessment ahead of an interview is a great way to help identify cultural and behavioural areas of potential conflict.

At SRO we use a fantastic tool called Prism Brain Mapping, that allows you to benchmark the most critical behavioural and cultural elements associated with the job and when candidates complete a questionnaire designed to encourage them to highlight the behaviours that are most critical to them and that motivate them, we get a clear indication of where those areas of potential conflict are.

These tools are an amazing interview aid and encourage the recruiter to dig in the right areas and uncover the areas of risk relating to that candidate, in regards to the job you are considering them for.

Many online tools that can be activated within your talent acquisition system will help minimise the risk of hiring the wrong people and help to ensure that interviews stay on point.

About the Author:

Mark Stephens

Mark has established a reputation for his passion and enthusiasm over twenty years working in the recruitment industry, both client and agency side. For the last seven years, he has been researching the recruitment landscape from both a technology and people perspective. His insights into market trends are often used and quoted across the industry’s leading publications.

His company, Smart Recruit Online, have been the winner of 5 international awards for technology innovation and Recruitment Technology in the last 18 months and currently hold the accolade of filling more jobs from direct applications for their clients than any other online recruitment service in the UK.

Connect with Mark Stephens on LinkedIn

 

Smart Recruit Online offers an award-winning talent attraction software that will streamline and revolutionise your recruitment strategy.

We offer a customisable software platform integrated with multiple selection and screening tools, enabling you to make well-informed recruitment decisions. 

To find out what we can to for your recruitment strategy, book a demo by clicking here.

Book a demo

 

 

Mark Stephens


Mark has established a reputation for his passion and enthusiasm over twenty years working in the recruitment industry, both client and agency side. For the last ten years, he has been researching the recruitment landscape from both a technology and people perspective. His insights into market trends are often used and quoted across the industry’s leading publications. His company, Smart Recruit Online, has been the winner of 5 international awards for technology innovation and Recruitment Technology in the last 18 months. And currently holds the accolade of filling more jobs from direct applications for their clients than any other online recruitment service in the UK.


You’re Probably Addressing Workplace Diversity All Wrong. Here’s What You Should Be Doing Instead
Danielle Meakin - 6 Comments - 29 Sep 2019

You’re Probably Addressing Workplace Diversity All Wrong. Here’s What You Should Be Doing Instead by Brad Wayland

These days, it seems as though inclusiveness is the golden goose for human resources, particularly those operating in technology. The problem is that most businesses go about it in entirely the wrong way, falling into toxic traps like hiring quotas and tokenism. This needs to change.

 

Diversity hire. 

How does that phrase make you feel? If you’re anything like me, not great. For one, it’s dehumanizing, reducing a new employee down to a single label, ignoring everything else about their accomplishments and who they are as a person.

You’re hiring them because of a quality over which they have no control rather than because of what they can do.

You’re no longer hiring  Kristin the Data Scientist, who graduated with top marks from Stanford. She’s Kristin the woman.  You aren’t hiring Greg the Marketing Director, with over ten years of experience and a master’s in Marketing Science from Columbia. You’re hiring Greg the black man.  You’re not hiring Lucas because he graduated from New York University and worked on Wall Street. You’re doing it because he’s gay, and you have a quota to fill.

You get the idea.

“I’m a dream hire for most technology companies,” writes Jori Ford,  Senior Director of Content and SEO at peer-to-peer G2 Crowd. “In an industry dominated by white, straight males, a lesbian with both black and Korean heritage checks a lot of boxes. And that’s the problem. In response to the demand for more diverse hiring practices, technology firms have resorted to quotas that ultimately miss the point.”

But isn’t it admirable to seek out men and women who are traditionally underrepresented in your industry?

Yes, but you need to be doing it for the right reasons. Not to fulfil some bogus corporate initiative or make your business look better in the eyes of investors and customers. And not with a focus that begins and ends at hiring and retention.

You should hire someone underrepresented because they might bring a unique perspective to your workplace. You should hire them because discrimination is harmful to everyone, at every level of a business. But most importantly, you should do it if you genuinely believe they’re the best candidate for the job. 

 

Health & Wellbeing Group

 

Rethinking your approach

There’s another angle to this whole conversation, as well. Simply bringing in a diversity hire will not make your workplace more diverse. Diversity requires that your organization rethink its values and mission. Here’s how:

• Work within your organization to find out what preconceptions your people hold about others, and why. Negative stereotypes do not develop in a vacuum, and challenging them is the first step to fostering greater inclusiveness.

• Look at your employees as people rather than resources, and ensure your colleagues do the same. Empathic leadership, as noted by tech publication CIO, is at the core of inclusiveness.

• Make diversity an ongoing effort rather than a single initiative, and focus on retention as well as hiring. Culture is not something that can be changed overnight, nor can inclusiveness be assured by handing out a few pamphlets.

• For the hiring process, consider implementing a blind evaluation phase. Your hiring department will look exclusively at each candidate’s credentials, without knowing anything else about their identity.

When you hire someone to fulfil a quota or simply for the sake of having a more diverse workplace, you’re putting the cart before the horse.  Diversity and inclusiveness aren’t something that can be automated, nor can they be dealt with through spreadsheets. Understanding that is the only way you’ll make your workplace genuinely inclusive.

 

About the Author

Brad Wayland is the Chief Strategy Officer at BlueCotton, a site with high-quality, easy-to-design custom t-shirts.

 

Smart Recruit Online offers an award-winning talent attraction software that will streamline and revolutionise your recruitment strategy.

To find out how we can tailor our services to match your recruitment needs, including reducing selection bias, click here.

 

Book a demo

BradWayland@smartrecrooot.com'
Brad Wayland


Brad Wayland is the Chief Strategy Officer at BlueCotton, a site with high-quality, easy-to-design custom t-shirts.


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